Everyday sexism: dad blasts school for gender stereotyping

7th December 2017 10:18 AM
A father has written a pointed letter about everyday sexism to his daughter's school. Source: Twitter A father has written a pointed letter about everyday sexism to his daughter's school. Source: Twitter

An irritated dad has sent a letter to his daughter's school blasting the old-fashioned gender-divide in activities offered to Year 6 students.

"I must draw your attention to a serious incident," wrote the New South Wales father to the principal in a letter he then posted on Twitter.

"When Ruby left for school yesterday it was 2017 but when she returned home in the afternoon she was from 1968.

"I know this to be the case as Ruby informed me that the 'girls' in Year 6 would be attending the school library to get their hair and make-up done on Monday afternoon while the 'boys' are going to Bunnings.

"Are you able to search the school buildings for a rip in the space-time continuum? Perhaps there is a faulty Flux Capacitor hidden away in the girls' toilet block?

"I look forward to this being rectified and my daughter and other girls at the school being returned to this millennium where school activities are not divided sharply along gender lines."

The father of three daughters told news.com.au his humorous letter made a serious point.

"I don't want to make a huge fuss ... this is mainly to point out everyday sexism," he said, adding that we've "still got a long way to go in this area".

He said Ruby "was affronted that she wasn't given the choice" and "very indignant that only the boys had the Bunnings option" - but still wanted to get her hair done.

"Yes the boys should be given the hairstyle choice too but girls and women still bear the brunt of thoughtless sexism," added the 12-year-old's dad, who is speaking to the principal this morning.

Ruby's mother, a secondary teacher, said this was typical of some of her male colleagues.

She said she often comes across male teachers who won't let female students go to the toilet and has to explain to them the girls may have their periods but are too embarrassed to mention it to a man.

The letter struck a chord with many readers after he posted it on social media, with users calling it "ace" and "10/10 parenting".

One woman said: "I'd much prefer Bunnings! I had to fight to do maths enrichment instead of grooming and deportment classes when I was at school. I was the only girl in that class."

Another said her school had sent the boys to a day playing basketball with the Sydney Kings the girls had to stay at school and do etiquette and deportment. "No choice given."